Written by / 5/04/2014 / No comments / , , ,

SPIELBERG DESIGNS A.I. FOR KUBRICK

year: 2001 rating: **1/2
The most intriguing aspect of A.I ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE is discovering where Stanley Kubrick ends and Steven Spielberg begins: A project that Kubrick was preparing since the early eighties, and then realized could be technologically realized after seeing his friend Steven's JURASSIC PARK, and so, with a completed script and storyboards, Spielberg took over when the legendary director died after completing his maligned opus, EYES WIDE SHUT…

As is common, ARTIFICIAL consists of three acts, only these seem like separate movies altogether: Opening with William Hurt’s Professor Hobby lecturing a group of technical designers on a new form of Artificial life: a child that will look, breath and feel very human. The character, immersed in exposition, is both speaking to them and us... After which we cut to a high class couple whose son (an only child) is in a coma and probably won’t recover: Enter SIX SENSE phenom Haley Joel Osment as David, literally created to love his new family, especially Monica (Francis O’Conner). Here’s where the movie, with futuristic settings and ominously slow paced dialogue, feels as much like a Kubrick film as possible i.e. Spielberg paying homage to his mentor: from the white pod-like vehicles to the slow-paced yet intriguing conversations... The only difference is the John William’s soundtrack pulling heartstrings as David's finally loved by his reluctant new mom. But after her human son recovers from the coma, David becomes a mere plaything, and not entirely wanted. Thus the second act becomes more of signature Spielberg film as our young hero, after accidentally endangering his sibling, is set free to live on his own with a talking Teddy Bear "super toy."

Boy and his bear
The action flows with Spielberg’s signature gliding cameras and bombastic soundtrack, but the character of David, joined by a male prostitute robot Gigolo Joe – played by Jude Law, attempting the kind of roguish energy of a young Kubrick-directed Malcolm McDowell combined with a devilish dash of David Niven – becomes second string to a robot destruction circus/derby, resembling a white trash Monster Truck show set in a MAD MAX: BEYOND THUNDERDOME style future.

A.I. attempts returning to the Kubrick roots after David finds his origin in Manhattan, where ice caps had melted the city into a watery ruin. Reminiscent of Keir Dullea’s arrival in the “Jupiter condo” in 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, the third act has David seeking a “blue fairy” since he was raised on, and mirrors the story of, Pinocchio – and eventually, thanks to those long armed, giraffe-necked aliens that Spielberg turned into cinematic messiahs since the 1970's, David gets a last wish, one the audience has to suffer a prolonged half-hour to finally reach.

While there are intriguing aspects of A.I, it’s much too convoluted with pathos and melodrama to be a truly involving adventure and at the same time, the action-packed mid-section disrupts the character development from the Kubrickian setup, which is the most thought-provoking and entertaining. But let’s give credit to perhaps the best character on board: the robotic, talking Teddy Bear, who seems more alive than mechanical, providing Jiminy Cricket logic and stealing the show.
Share This Post :
Tags : , , ,

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.

Featured Post

HAMMER'S 'THE TWO FACES OF DR. JEKYLL' WITH CHRISTOPHER LEE

Dawn Addams & Christopher Lee Year: 1960 Rating: *** When THE TWO FACES OF DR. JEKYLL came out, The Swinging Sixties were on the horizon...

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

All Time Popular

WWW.CULTFILMFREAKS.COM

WWW.CULTFILMFREAKS.COM
Movie Reviews, Interviews, Articles and Pop Culture from White Heat to Blue City

MONTH OF CHARLES BRONSON

TOTAL HITS

Popular Trending

FOUNDED BY JAMES M. TATE

FOUNDED BY JAMES M. TATE
RANDOM QUOTE: "Happy? Why does everybody have to be happy all the time?" Martin Clunes as Doc Martin

CRIME/FILM NOIR/NEO NOIR


EXPLOSIVE CINEMA OF CHARLES BRONSON

FAVORITES SHORTLIST

1)OTLEY 2)THE FEARMAKERS 3)HOT CARS 4)RAIDERS FROM BENEATH THE SEA 5)CANYON PASSAGE 6)THE CROWDED SKY 7)JUNGLE STREET 8)VIOLENT SATURDAY 9)ANATOMY OF A MURDER 10)THE MAN FROM LARAMIE 11)HARDCORE 12)SHARKS' TREASURE 13)SWEENEY TWO 14)EASY LIVING 15)PULP 16)THE SYSTEM 17)WHITE HEAT 18)THE SERGEANT 19)AL CAPONE 20)FALLEN ANGEL 21)ASH WEDNESDAY 22)CURSE OF THE DEMON 23)THE DEFECTOR 24)KILLER FISH 25)AIR PATROL 26)DUEL IN THE JUNGLE 27)HELL IS A CITY 28)WILLIAM CONRAD'S BRAINSTORM 29)JOURNEY INTO FEAR 30)WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS

ACTORS 1)DANA ANDREWS 2)JAMES CAGNEY 3)MARLON BRANDO 4)JACK NICHOLSON 5)ORSON WELLES 6)CHARLES BRONSON 7)TOM COURTENAY 8)PETER O'TOOLE 9)VICTOR MATURE 10)STANLEY BAKER ACTRESSES 1)VIRGINIA MAYO 2)SUE LYON 3)GENE TIERNEY 4)MERRY ANDERS 5)JESSICA LANGE DIRECTORS 1)JACQUES TOURNEUR 2)RICHARD FLEISCHER 3)STANLEY KUBRICK 4)ORSON WELLES 5)OTTO PREMINGER 6)JOHN CARPENTER 7)VAL GUEST 8)JOHN LANDIS 9)MICHAEL WINNER 10)SAM PECKINPAH

BRITISH NEW WAVE CINEMA

RARITIES & EXPLOITATION

HAMMER HORROR & NOIR

Popular This Month

WESTERN GENRE REVIEWS

ALL KINDS OF HORROR

CINEMA OF DANA ANDREWS

PEAKING IN THE SIXTIES

KICKING IN THE EIGHTIES

TALES AND REFLECTIONS

REVVING THE SEVENTIES

RANDOM LABELS LEFTOVER

Most Popular Last Year

PUNCHING UP THE THIRTIES

PEELING OUT THE FORTIES

BACK TO THE FIFTIES

RETURN TO THE HOMEPAGE